Home Tourism and Adventure Niagara Falls City Economic History

Niagara Falls City Economic History

by admin
57 views

Economic History of Niagara Falls City

            Niagara Falls city is in the municipality of Ontario, a port on the Niagara River opposite of New York. It overlooks the Horseshoe and carries nine times more water than the Niagara Falls in America. The city is Ontario’s main tourism destination and a centre of energy. It is connected to the US side by several bridges including the Whirlpool and Queenstown Bridge. They have manufacturers of processed food, chemicals, automotive parts, paper goods, and wines and alcohol. The city also has storage warehouses, information technology centers that serve as the city’s economy.

            The City known as Niagara Falls was once a Township number 2 to Mount Dorchester. It was suggested that the United Empire Loyalists would inhibit it in the year 1781. Its roads were Concessions and Lines that became the main grids, the Portage Road that passes through Niagara Falls, and driveways that connect homesteads to the main arteries that became the Lundy’s Lane[1]. The Portage road was used to portage goods in land through the Niagara Falls in the western side of the River. The area previously was known as Mount Dorchester was renamed Stamford Township.

            The Stamford Township played a key role in the war of 1812- 1814. Since the area was a major site for the battle. This battle of the Lundy’s Lane was the worst battle in Canada soil. After it ended the US, army attacked the Bridgewater Mills that was located in Dufferin Islands. There was constructions of hydroelectric stations in the first decade of the 20th century. There were several ventures launched in the 1920s and 1950s., that were essential to the development of electricity in the Niagara Falls[2].

Niagara Falls City Economic History

References
  • Anastakis, Dimitry, and Andrew Smith. (2014). Smart globalization: the Canadian business and economic history experience. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
  • Gérin, Annie, and James S. McLean (2009).  Public art in Canada: critical perspectives. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
  • Hampton, Howard, and Bill Reno (2003). Public power the fight for publicly owned electricity. Toronto, ON: Insomniac Press. http://www.deslibris.ca/ID/407996.
  • Hayakawa, Yuichi S., and Yukinori Matsukura (2010). “Stability analysis of waterfall cliff   face at Niagara Falls: An implication to erosional mechanism of waterfall.” Engineering geology 116, no. 1: 178-183.
  • Hollander, Justin B., and Bernard Cahill (2011). “Confronting population decline in the     buffalo, new york, region: a close reading of the” erie-niagara framework for regional        growth”.” Journal of Architectural and Planning Research: 252-267.
  • Palassio, Christina, and Alana Wilcox. (2009). The edible city Toronto’s food from farm to fork. Toronto: Coach House Books http://public.eblib.com/choice/publicfullrecord.aspx?p=760176.
  • Sakaguchi, Kendra, and Stephan Schott. “The Value of Water Flow Adjustments over Niagara Falls.” (2013).
  • Beesley, K. B. (Ed.). (2010). The rural-urban fringe in Canada: Conflict and controversy. Rural Development Institute.
  • Thibert, Joël. 2015. Governing urban regions through collaboration: a view from North America. Toronto: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
  • [1] Anastakis, Dimitry, and Andrew Smith. 2014. Smart globalization: the Canadian business and economic history experience.
  • [2] Anastakis, Dimitry, and Andrew Smith. 2014. Smart globalization: the Canadian business and economic history experience.
  • [3] Gérin, Annie, and James S. McLean. 2009. Public art in Canada: critical perspectives. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
  • [4] Gérin, Annie, and James S. McLean. 2009. Public art in Canada: critical perspectives. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
  • [5] Sakaguchi, Kendra, and Stephan Schott. “The Value of Water Flow Adjustments over Niagara Falls.” (2013).
  • [6] Hollander, Justin B., and Bernard Cahill. “CONFRONTING POPULATION DECLINE IN THE BUFFALO, NEW YORK, REGION: A CLOSE READING OF THE” ERIE-NIAGARA FRAMEWORK FOR REGIONAL GROWTH”.” Journal of Architectural and Planning Research (2011): 252-267.
  • [7] Gérin, Annie, and James S. McLean. 2009. Public art in Canada: critical perspectives. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
  • [8] Hampton, Howard, and Bill Reno. 2003. Public power the fight for publicly owned electricity. Toronto, ON: Insomniac Press. http://www.deslibris.ca/ID/407996.
  • [9] Hampton, Howard, and Bill Reno. 2003. Public power the fight for publicly owned electricity. Toronto, ON: Insomniac Press. http://www.deslibris.ca/ID/407996.
  • [10] Thibert, Joël. 2015. Governing urban regions through collaboration: a view from North America.
  • [11] Palassio, Christina, and Alana Wilcox. 2009. The edible city Toronto’s food from farm to fork. Toronto: Coach House Books. http://public.eblib.com/choice/publicfullrecord.aspx?p=760176.
  • [12] Gérin, Annie, and James S. McLean. 2009. Public art in Canada: critical perspectives. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
  • [13] Hampton, Howard, and Bill Reno. 2003. Public power the fight for publicly owned electricity. Toronto, ON: Insomniac Press. http://www.deslibris.ca/ID/407996.
  • [14] Hampton, Howard, and Bill Reno. 2003. Public power the fight for publicly owned electricity. Toronto, ON: Insomniac Press. http://www.deslibris.ca/ID/407996.

Related Posts

Leave a Comment